Seri Wood Santo Collected by William Neil Smith

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Seri Wood Santo Collected by William Neil Smith

Collected around 1950

Length – 5 3/4″    Width – 2 1/16″

Santos when worn around the neck protected the wearer from illness. When tied to the doorway, it prevented illness, evil and death from entering the house.

From the collection of Anthropologist William Neil “Seri Bill” Smith, Jr. who was born in 1920 in New York City and moved to Tucson, Arizona at age fourteen. He attended the University of Arizona from 1939-42 and 1946-48, studying under Byron Cummings and Edward Spicer. From 1945-1967, Smith made many extended ethnographical field trips to Sonora, Mexico, to study the Seri Indians at Desemboque and Tiburon Island. His research included lifestyle, customs, language, genealogy, kinship, and cultural changes due to the influence of outsiders. Smith’s personal Seri Indian collection was assembled while doing his fieldwork. The collection consists of over 700 objects covering all aspects of Seri life. Most of the objects were collected from 1947-1951. University of Arizona Special collections holds 24 linear feet on Smith’s archives and photography.  I bought the entire collection nearly 15 years ago and am now selling off some of items that I kept from the collection.

$550.00

 

 

 

 

Seri Wood Santo Collected by William Neil Smith

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Seri Wood Santo Collected by William Neil Smith

Height – 10 5/8″   Width – 3″

Santos when worn around the neck protected the wearer from illness. When tied to the doorway, it prevented illness, evil and death from entering the house.

From the collection of Anthropologist William Neil “Seri Bill” Smith, Jr. who was born in 1920 in New York City and moved to Tucson, Arizona at age fourteen. He attended the University of Arizona from 1939-42 and 1946-48, studying under Byron Cummings and Edward Spicer. From 1945-1967, Smith made many extended ethnographical field trips to Sonora, Mexico, to study the Seri Indians at Desemboque and Tiburon Island. His research included lifestyle, customs, language, genealogy, kinship, and cultural changes due to the influence of outsiders. Smith’s personal Seri Indian collection was assembled while doing his fieldwork. The collection consists of over 700 objects covering all aspects of Seri life. Most of the objects were collected from 1947-1951. University of Arizona Special collections holds 24 linear feet on Smith’s archives and photography.  I bought the entire collection nearly 15 years ago and am now selling off some of items that I kept from the collection

$750.00

Spanish Colonial Wood Stirrups

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Spanish Colonial Wood Stirrups

A pair of carved wood open stirrups from Mexico.

Frontier Stirrups w/Hapsburg Eagles

Circa 1780-1820

$1200.00

Mexican Santo

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Mexican Santo

Rare Pair of Large Seri Indian Dolls

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Rare Pair of Large Seri Indian Dolls

Height – Male – 26″     Female – 15″

Collected in the late 40’s by William Neil “Seri Bill” Smith. One of the most famous early adventurers in to Seri Land which is north Bahia Kino in Sonora, Mexico. These coastal people lived in a very hostile desert area on the Sea of Cortez and on Isla Tiburon (Shark Island). These dolls were made by the women for their children.  Supposedly the 2nd largest collection that exists. Over the years, I have had to break up the collection. These two dolls (on custom mounts) are the best of the collection. They are wearing early cotton clothing and have shell necklaces.

From the collection of Anthropologist William Neil “Seri Bill” Smith, Jr. who was born in 1920 in New York City and moved to Tucson, Arizona at age fourteen. He attended the University of Arizona from 1939-42 and 1946-48, studying under Byron Cummings and Edward Spicer. From 1945-1967, Smith made many extended ethnographical field trips to Sonora, Mexico, to study the Seri Indians at Desemboque and Tiburon Island. His research included lifestyle, customs, language, genealogy, kinship, and cultural changes due to the influence of outsiders. Smith’s personal Seri Indian collection was assembled while doing his fieldwork. The collection consists of over 700 objects covering all aspects of Seri life. Most of the objects were collected from 1947-1951. University of Arizona Special collections holds 24 linear feet on Smith’s archives and photography.  I bought the entire collection nearly 15 years ago and am now selling off some of items that I kept from the collection

$2500.00

Mexican Lady of Guadalupe Painted Wooden Offering Box

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Mexican Painted Wooden Offering Box

19th Cent.

Height –  17″    Width – 10″  Depth – 4 3/4″

Wonderful Painted Mexican Wooden Offering Box with a painting depicting “Our Lady of Guadalupe”

From collection of John Dewar

He was the Curator of the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History and the Southwest Museum. He was born in Pasadena, CA and graduated from the College of Mexico City in the early 30’s and then moved back to the Los Angeles area to begin his job as curator. He also traveled to the Hopi Pueblos and over to the Santa Fe area in 1934 and then up the coast of N. California around 1935. Most of the items he collected there were Yurok, although most of his ethnographic collection was given to the Southwest Museum in 1941. After he retired he moved to Patagonia, Arizona until he passed away in 2004. Fifteen years after I bought my first item from his collection (a classic late 18th Cent. Saltillo Serape), I bought the remainder of his collection, which included this Mexican Offering Box width a painting of Lady of Guadalupe.

$1500.00

 

Mexican Santo in Wooden Nicho

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Mexican Santo in Wooden Nicho

Circa late 19th Cent.

Height –  10″ w/Nicho 14 1/2″       Width – w/ Nicho – 6 1/2″

Arms are articulate with cloth t the elbow joint. Some damage to hands

From collection of John Dewar

He was the Curator of the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History and the Southwest Museum. He was born in Pasadena, CA and graduated from the College of Mexico City in the early 30’s and then moved back to the Los Angeles area to begin his job as curator. He also traveled to the Hopi Pueblos and over to the Santa Fe area in 1934 and then up the coast of N. California around 1935. Most of the items he collected there were Yurok, although most of his ethnographic collection was given to the Southwest Museum in 1941. After he retired he moved to Patagonia, Arizona until he passed away in 2004. Fifteen years after I bought my first item from his collection (a classic late 18th Cent. Saltillo Serape), I bought the remainder of his collection, which included this Mexican Wooden Santo in the Wooden Nicho.

$750.00